Georgetown Visitation Monastery

“Live Jesus whom I Love”

The Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary has its roots in early seventeenth-century France. Francis de Sales and Jane de Chantal saw the opportunity for the creation of an order that would welcome women seeking a religious vocation in order to deepen their relationship with God.

Our Vowed Life

We, the sisters of the Visitation of Holy Mary, have freely responded to a call to follow Jesus by being gathered in loving prayerful communities that are characterized by fidelity to the gospel and the church.

Our Prayer Life

Live Jesus! Prayer of the heart is the very essence of our Visitation way of life.  We strive to keep prayer at the center of all we do as we nurture the loving presence of God in our minds and hearts.

Our Community Life

We are called by God to create a prayerful and loving community where each Sister is a gift to others.  We find the source and goal of our union in the love of the heart of Jesus Christ, to whom we are consecrated in a special way.

Our History

Reflecting moderation and a well-balanced approach to religious life.

Vocations

Our vocation enables us to share in the redemptive mission of Jesus according to the inspiration of our Founders, St. Francis de Sales and St. Jane de Chantal. 

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Georgetown Visitation Monastery

Vocational Ministry: The Gospel values proposed by our Founders St. Francis de Sales and St. Jane de Chantal encourage us to follow Jesus - to "live Jesus!" in all we do and think and say and through each moment of the day. We are called to create a prayerful and loving community where each person is a gift to others. We find the source and goal of our union in the heart of Jesus Christ to whom we are consecrated in a special way.
Georgetown Visitation Monastery
Georgetown Visitation Monastery
His father was reluctant to send John to the seminary—he could not afford the cost of educating John, and could not spare the boy’s work on the farm. When John was 20, he was finally allowed to leave home to begin his studies.

John had only attended school for a brief time when he was young, and struggled mightily with school. Latin, especially, was a cross for him, and he became discouraged when he did not improve even though he worked hard at it.
His superiors tried to hide his deficiencies by posting him in a backwater hamlet—he was made pastor of a church in Ars, a small village of about 250 people.
People began to seek him out especially for Confession—they came from far away to receive his guidance. From 1830-1845, more than 300 people visited Ars a day. In fact, the train station at Lyons issued special round-trip tickets to Ars for an eight-day trip because that is how long it took for people to get a chance to speak with John. He would spend 12 hours a day in the confessional in the winter, and up to 16 hours a day in the summer. Rich and poor, lay people and religious—even bishops sought him out.
John had a gift for reading people’s hearts, and could offer guidance with only a few words. He was able to remind people of sins they had forgotten to mention to him, and knew details of their lives that they had kept secret. In one case, he warned a servant girl that she faced a great danger at home in the coming days. His warning allowed her to escape from a serial killer, and she testified against the murderer at trial. In another case, a widow came to ask for his advice about her son, who had decided to marry a younger woman. When she arrived, the church was packed, but John suddenly marched out of the confessional, walked up to her, and said, “Let them marry. They will be very happy!”
John kept up the amazing pace of his ministry into his old age, giving even more as he aged. In the last year of his life, more than 100,000 people visited him at Ars. He finally wore out at the age of 73, and fell ill. Even on his deathbed, he called a few faithful in to finish their confessions. When priests came for his last rites, he said, “It is sad to receive holy Communion for the last time.” He died on this date in 1859 in the midst of a crashing thunderstorm. .Saint John Vianney pray for us.
Georgetown Visitation Monastery
Georgetown Visitation Monastery
more pictures of the the graduating!
Georgetown Visitation Monastery
Georgetown Visitation Monastery
We invite you to learn more about our life
as we strive to walk gently and humbly in the footsteps of St. Francis de Sales and St. Jane de Chantal.
Come, "Live Jesus" with us!
Please contact our Vocations Director:
vocations@visi.org 202-740-8423
gvmonastery.org
1500 35th St. N.W, Washington, DC 20007